The Early History of Charles James Fox

By George Trevelyan Otto | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI. 1770.

The Effect produced upon the Political World by the Reappearance of Lord Chatham. -- His Speech upon the Address. -- Camden and Granby separate themselves from their Colleagues. -- Savile rebukes the House of Commons. -- Charles Yorke and the Great Seal. -- The Duke of Grafton resigns. -- David Hume. -- Lord North goes to the Treasury. -- George the Third, his Ministers and his Policy. -- George Grenville on Election Petitions and the Civil List. -- Chatham denounces the Corruption of Parliament. -- Symptoms of Popular Discontent. -- The City's Remonstrance presented to the King and condemned by Parliament. -- Imminent Danger of a Collision between the Nation and its Rulers. -- The Letter to the King. -- Horace Walpole on the Situation. -- The Personal Character of Wilkes, and its Influence upon the History of the Country. -- Wilkes regains his Liberty. -- His Subsequent Career, and the Final Solution of the Controversy about the Middlesex Election.

EVEN Chatham's love of a stage effect must have been gratified to the full by the commotion which his political resurrection excited. Nothing resembling it can be quoted from parliamentary history; though the theatre supplies a sufficiently close parallel in the situation where Lucio, in "Measure for Measure," pulls aside the cowl of the friar and discloses the features of the ruler who has returned at the moment when he is least expected to call his deputy to account for the evil deeds that had been done in his name. Grafton, the Angelo of the piece, accepted his fate as submissively and almost as promptly as his dramatic prototype. Still loyal at heart to the great man whose authority he had abused, or rather permitted others to abuse, he was dumfounded when Chatham, emerging from the royal closet, met his greeting with the frigid politeness of a redoubted swordsman who salutes before a mortal duel. The unfortunate prime-minister knew that he had sinned too conspicuously to be forgiven, and envied in his heart those less prominent members of his own

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The Early History of Charles James Fox
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II - 1749-1768 35
  • Chapter III 61
  • Chapter IV 102
  • Chapter V - 1768-1769 138
  • Chapter VI - 1770 193
  • Chapter VII 245
  • Chapter VIII - 1770-1771 289
  • Chapter IX - 1771-1772 348
  • Chapter X - 1772-1774 390
  • Index 453
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