The Early History of Charles James Fox

By George Trevelyan Otto | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X. 1772-1774.

The Moral Danger of the Position in which Fox now stood. -- He attacks Lord North on the Church Nullum Tempus Bill, and resigns the Admiralty. -- The Motives of his Conduct. -- Marriages of the Dukes of Cumberland and Gloucester. -- Anger of the King. -- The Royal Marriage Bill. -- The Bill gets through the Lords, is strenuously opposed in the Commons, and with difficulty passes into Law. -- Strong Feeling of Fox on the Qnestion. -- His Earnest Efforts against the Measure. -- His Sentiments with Regard to Women, and his Eager Care of their Rights and Interests in Parliament. -- His Private Life. -- The Bettingbook at Brooks's. -- Personal Tastes and Habits of Charles Fox. -- His Extravagance and Indebtedness. -- Horace Walpole on Fox. -- Influence and Popularity of the Young Man in the House of Commons. -- Fox goes to the Treasury. -- Lord Clive. -- Fox and Johnson. -- John Horne Tooke. -- Fox leaves the Ministry, never to return.

FOR the present, however, there was no love lost between the Dissenters and their champion of the future. Ten years of George the Third's policy had separated the nation into two deeply marked and intensely hostile factions, which in their composition, and even their titles, revived some of the most ominous associations in our history. "The names of Whig and Tory," said a political writer in the year 1774, "have for some time been laid aside, and that of the Court party and Country party substituted in their room;" and when English politics took the shape that they had worn under the Stuarts, there was no doubt on which side the Nonconformists would be banded. Those were days when it was not permitted to be friend and enemy by halves; and an occasional vote or speech in favor of religious liberty did not make Independents and Presbyterians, who were Wilkites almost to a man, forget that Charles Fox had been foremost in keeping the representative of Middlesex out of the House of Commons, and in preventing the people of England from

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The Early History of Charles James Fox
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II - 1749-1768 35
  • Chapter III 61
  • Chapter IV 102
  • Chapter V - 1768-1769 138
  • Chapter VI - 1770 193
  • Chapter VII 245
  • Chapter VIII - 1770-1771 289
  • Chapter IX - 1771-1772 348
  • Chapter X - 1772-1774 390
  • Index 453
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