A United Nations Peace Force

By William R. Frye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
The Next Crisis

Putting a United Nations police force together from scratch in eight days is like visiting the Louvre in 15 minutes. It is better than not doing it at all -- but that is about all that can be said for it. No one in his right mind would do it that way if he could help it.

Another time, if the UN is confronted with a crisis like that of November, 1956, the very least that would be useful would be a guide book, a distillation of knowledge and experience. In addition, the world organization would speak with more authority and act with more practical effect if it had at its fingertips a permanent police force, ready to do at least the limited kind of noncombatant duties that were assigned to UNEF.

Had such a force been available for use in Egypt, it is possible that the British-French invasion could have been forestalled altogether. Countries like Britain and France, sensitive to the moral judgment of mankind, require persuasive pretexts when they resort to force to gain their ends. Without such pretexts, they are unlikely to take action which the world -- including many of their own people -- will condemn. London and Paris scarcely could have announced to the world that they were attacking Egypt, and hence risking World War III, just to overthrow President Nasser and force internationalization of Suez. A government in Paris might conceivably have gotten away with such candor, given Egypt's aid to the Algerian rebels; but in London the cabinet would have been overthrown in 24 hours, and the party might not have regained power for a generation. The pretext that was, in fact, used -- that because the UN was not in a position to act, they were going to separate the belligerents, halt the fighting, and protect the Suez Canal -- would not have seemed persuasive, even to them, if a UN police force had been standing by, ready to perform those tasks. It is hard to see on what basis, then, the delegates of Britain and France could have vetoed a cease-fire

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A United Nations Peace Force
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.