A United Nations Peace Force

By William R. Frye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
Looking Ahead

In an age of hydrogen bombs, intercontinental missiles, jet planes and napalm, it may seem child's play to talk about police forces patrolling borders with rifles and flashy armbands. Surely, the skeptic would say, such toys can have no relevance to the basic issues of our time. Make the UN a world government; give it a monopoly of military might; disarm the great powers, and enforce the peace -- this, some would contend, is the only solution. Junk the UN; silence the meaningless clacketyclack; depend for security on more and better weapons; and the rest of the world be damned -- this, say others, is the realistic approach.

Truly realistic thinking, however, must start with the world as it is, not as it may be 50 years from now or as it was before Hiroshima. There is today no conceivable way of persuading either the Soviet Union or the United States to disarm and entrust its security to a world government. Not when atomic scientists have shown it to be a technical impossibility for either side to be sure the other has, in fact, destroyed its nuclear weapons. There being so such thing as "enforceable" total disarmament, the most that can be expected from any future East-West detente is a moderation of the arms race, an easing of major political issues (such as the unification of Germany), and inspection machinery to minimize the danger of surprise atomic attack. Stockpiles of nuclear weapons will continue to exist, together with ever-improving means of delivery. As far as anyone now living can see into the future, the fundamental strategic fact will continue to be a capacity for mutual annihilation in the hands of both the United States and the Soviet Union. Unless there is some dramatic breakthrough in the field of defense, neither great power will be able to survive the outbreak of a major nuclear war.

This might not be an unacceptable state of affairs if, out of

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A United Nations Peace Force
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.