The Life of George Washington: Studied Anew

By Edward Everett Hale | Go to book overview

THE LIFE
OF
GEORGE WASHINGTON.

CHAPTER I.

BOYHOOD AND EDUCATION.

Birthplace of George Washington--His Father and Mother--A New Home near Fredricksburg--Early Training--Lawrence Washington --School Books--Land-Surveying--Death of Augustine Washington --The Fairfax Family and Marriage of Lawrence Washington--Mt. Vernon and Belvoir--Letters Ascribed to Washington and Richard Henry Lee--Sea Life Proposed--The Proposal Abandoned--Lord Fairfax--Surveying as a Profession--Geo. Washington's First Love- Trials--His Verses to "The Lowland Beauty"--His First Commission.

ON the day of George Washington's birth, be there was nothing to suggest that he was to be the foremost man of his time. He was born in an old Virginia farm-house in Westmoreland County, on a spot which overlooks the Potomac River, near where Bridge's Creek falls into that river. His father was Augustine Washington, who had, two years before, married Mary Ball. George Washington was her oldest son; she had afterwards three other sons and two daughters. By another wife Augustine Washington had two sons

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The Life of George Washington: Studied Anew
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Introduction. xiii
  • Chapter I - Boyhood and Education. 1
  • Chapter II - Early Manhood. 16
  • Chapter III - First Campaign. 37
  • Chapter V - War on the Frontier. 86
  • Chapter VII - Trouble with England. 137
  • Chapter VIII - Appointment as General. 160
  • Chapter IX - 1777-1778. 204
  • Chapter X - End of the War. 231
  • Chapter XI - Home Revisited. 263
  • Chapter XIII - The Constitution and Presidency. 311
  • Chapter XIV - Closing Years at Mount Vernon. 338
  • Chapter XV - Conclusion. 373
  • Index. 383
  • The Story of the Nations. *
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