The Life of George Washington: Studied Anew

By Edward Everett Hale | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III.

FIRST CAMPAIGN.

Emigration to the West--The Ohio Company--Appointment from Gov. Dinwiddie--A Winter Journey to Visit the French Commander-- Venango and Fort Le Bœuf--Washington's Diary--The French Answer--A New Commission--War in Fact--The First Bullets--A Retreat--Fort Necessity--Carlyle's Account; Smollett's; the "Half-King's" Criticism--Washington's Welcome and Reception in Virginia.

THE reputation of Washington as a military commander, was made before he was twentysix years old. It is an interesting illustration of the history of this country, that, from the very beginning, its fortunes should so often have been intrusted to the foresight, promptness, courage, decision, and judgment of young men. The immediate undertaking on which Washington was engaged in his early life, which endeared him so closely to the people of Virginia, and which eventually made him known to the people throughout the colonies, was an enterprise of colonization. It was true then as it is true to this hour, that the business of the young American is to found new States. Lawrence Washington, with wisdom and foresight which would have made him a distinguished man, had he lived, had entered on an enterprise for the coloni-

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The Life of George Washington: Studied Anew
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Introduction. xiii
  • Chapter I - Boyhood and Education. 1
  • Chapter II - Early Manhood. 16
  • Chapter III - First Campaign. 37
  • Chapter V - War on the Frontier. 86
  • Chapter VII - Trouble with England. 137
  • Chapter VIII - Appointment as General. 160
  • Chapter IX - 1777-1778. 204
  • Chapter X - End of the War. 231
  • Chapter XI - Home Revisited. 263
  • Chapter XIII - The Constitution and Presidency. 311
  • Chapter XIV - Closing Years at Mount Vernon. 338
  • Chapter XV - Conclusion. 373
  • Index. 383
  • The Story of the Nations. *
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