The Life of George Washington: Studied Anew

By Edward Everett Hale | Go to book overview

for his resignation. The act in itself was dramatic, the arrangements made for it were dignified, and his resignation is still remembered among the critical moments of his life. A picture by Trumbull, in the Capitol at Washington, commemorates it, and his address has been widely circulated. One of the closing passages is in these words:

"Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of action, and bidding an affectionate farewell to this august body, under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life."1

The next day he reached Mount Vernon, having been in command of the army more than eight and a half years. In that time he had seen his home only when he visited it with Count de Rochambeau, and on his return from Yorktown.

____________________
1
It is, perhaps, not beneath the dignity of history to record that, at the present moment, one of the jokes of the Naval Academy at Annapolis is to say that Washington endured all the terrors of the war, the starvation of Valley Forge, and every intricacy of politics; but that when he came to so dull a place as Annapolis he was obliged to give up his commission.

-262-

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The Life of George Washington: Studied Anew
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface. iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • Introduction. xiii
  • Chapter I - Boyhood and Education. 1
  • Chapter II - Early Manhood. 16
  • Chapter III - First Campaign. 37
  • Chapter V - War on the Frontier. 86
  • Chapter VII - Trouble with England. 137
  • Chapter VIII - Appointment as General. 160
  • Chapter IX - 1777-1778. 204
  • Chapter X - End of the War. 231
  • Chapter XI - Home Revisited. 263
  • Chapter XIII - The Constitution and Presidency. 311
  • Chapter XIV - Closing Years at Mount Vernon. 338
  • Chapter XV - Conclusion. 373
  • Index. 383
  • The Story of the Nations. *
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