The Essentials of Aesthetics in Music, Poetry, Painting, Sculpture and Architecture

By George Lansing Raymond | Go to book overview

INDEX.

A
Abruptness, art-method, 277, 312-316
Æneid, 117, 188
Aërial, perspective, 92, 93, 262
Æsthetic arts, 6: aim of, 39, 40; pleasure in, 389, 390; principles coincide with those of ethics, 384, 385; use of term, iv
After-image in colour, 371
Aim, the mental, represented in pitch, 199
Allegorical painting, 166, 168
Alliteration, 279, 365
Alteration, art-method, 277, 303
Alternation, art-method, 222, 303
Alum Bay, Talfourd, 162
American Journal of Psychology, 323
Analogy between representation in sound and sight, 214; in work of the artist, 56, 65, 67. See Comparison and Imagination
Ananias, Death of, Raphael, 233
Ancient Art, History of, Winckelmann, 183
Ancient Mariner, The, Coleridge, 29
Angelo, Michael, 72, 94-97, 181, 188, 224
Angles, meaning of, 244-252. See Outlines
Annual Register, 46
Apollo Belvedere, 170
Architecture Byzantine, 251, 252; elements of expression in, 213-268; Gothic, 31, 101, 219, 251-253, 317, 318; Greek, 101-108, 219, 251-253; imitation in, 15, 97-100; involves an external product, 15; Moorish, 31; perspective in, 101- 108, 335; phase of consciousness represented in, 145-149; progress represented in, 318; proportion in, 335, 340-344, 355; related to scenery, 31; Renaissance, 31; representation in, 99, 124-129, 252; representation in, 272, 279; separated from painting and sculpture, 172-174; styles, 76, 77; thought expressed in, 15, 124-129
Ariadne, 171
Aristotle, 34, 294
Arm gestures, meaning of, 230, 232, 240-243
Arnold, M., 212
Art, a method, 2; fine, 5, 6, 161 modern Hedonic, view of, 387, 388; nature made human, 4, 10; not communication, 109-129; not imitation, 76- 108; versus religion, 48-51; versus science, 51-57
Art of Painting, Reynolds, 52 305
Art-impulse, 39-55
Art in Theory, 36
Art, its Laws and the Reasons for Them, Long, 189, 250, 305
Artist, 60, 137-140; his mental action versus that in religion or science, 39-58; his temperament, 57-62; how far he thinks of both form and signi-

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