The Theology of the Old Testament

By Otto J. Baab | Go to book overview

6. The Kingdom of God

SINCE the exact phrase "kingdom of God" nowhere appears in the Old Testament, a serious question may be raised relative to the wisdom of including it in an outline of Old Testament theology. In justification it may be said that the ground work for the formulation of this concept has been laid in the Old Testament writings, even though the results were not labeled with the title by the biblical writers. The idea of the kingdom of God brings together illuminatingly within the scope of a single thought pattern the essential features of world redemption--in history and beyond history--as these were taught by Israel's religious thinkers. Here may be associated the major postulates of this people's faith relative to God, man, history, sin, and salvation. Such an association permits a view of the whole process of salvation in terms of its origin, its successive advances and recessions, and its ultimate goal in the triumph of God in history.

The fact that the modern interpreter is unavoidably called upon to attempt his own synthesis in the absence of a pre-existing biblical synthesis, and that he may fail to do justice to his sources, is a risk he must take, unless he abandons entirely the effort to find religious meanings and viewpoints in his materials. However, if his theological construction rests upon critically defensible data found in the records or upon valid and pertinent extrabiblical evidence, the result may be considered sound and useful to the wider purpose of identifying the elements of Old Testament theology. The raw materials out of which the concept of the kingdom of God is constructed themselves assume a life and meaning which they could not possibly have had in textual and logical isolation.

Further justification for this study lies in the curious fact that the principal teaching attributed to Jesus in the Gospels is that pertaining to the kingdom of God, according to competent New Testament scholars, although they find in the Old Testament only a very limited amount of material upon which Jesus could have drawn in developing his teaching. E. F. Scott excellent work The Kingdom of God in the New Testament makes a brief statement as to the Old Testament background

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Theology of the Old Testament
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Preface 7
  • Contents 11
  • 1: The Study of Old Testament Theology 13
  • 2: The Meaning of God 23
  • 3: The Nature of Man 54
  • 4: The Idea of Sin 84
  • 5. Salvation in the Old Testament 114
  • 6: The Kingdom of God 156
  • 7: Death and the Hereafter 198
  • 8: The Problem of Evil 226
  • 9: The Validity of Old Testament Theology 250
  • Selected Bibliography 273
  • Index of Biblical Passages 275
  • Index of Subjects 279
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.