Language and Communication

By George A. Miller | Go to book overview
1. How could we use visible speech equipment to aid in the correction of speech disorders?
2. Speech sounds affect the person who makes them in much the same way they affect the person who listens to them. Are there other stimuli we could generate that would have this advantage?
3. Is there any evidence in the visible speech records to support the notion that the syllable is an important unit for the analysis of speech movements?
4. The Bell Telephone Laboratories have built a device that synthesizes a fairly good imitation of human speech. How does it work?

SELECTED REFERENCES
BLOCH B., and G. L. TRAGER. Outline of Linguistic Analysis. Baltimore: Linguistic Society of America, Waverly Press, 1942. At that time an excellent introduction to phonetics and phonemics. Surveys techniques used by linguists for working with native speakers to arrive at a complete description of a language.
CURRY R. O. Mechanism of the Human Voice. New York: Longmans, 1940. A concise review of a large body of experimental results.
FLETCHER HARVEY. Speech and Hearing. New York: Van Nostrand, 1929. This book, which summarizes the research of the Bell Telephone Laboratories prior to 1929, has become a classic reference in the field of telephonic communication.
GRAY G. W., and C. M. WISE. The Bases of Speech ( Rev. Ed.). New York: Harper, 1946. Chapters II-V of this general text provide supplementary reading for the present chapter.
POTTER, RALPH K., G. A. KOPP, and H. C. GREEN. Visible Speech. New York: Van Nostrand, 1947. Presents the basic technical and phonetic principles of visible speech, with procedures to be used in teaching people to read these patterns.
SHANNON C. E., and W. WEAVER. The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1949. Students with mathematical training can extend their knowledge of information theory by reading Shannon's work. Students without such training will find Weaver's popularization readable.
WOOD ALEXANDER. Acoustics. New York: Interscience, 1941. A readable book in acoustics for the student who wants to push his information in this area beyond the scanty glimpse provided in this chapter.

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Language and Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Preface to Revised Edition vi
  • Preface vi
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword to the Teacher xi
  • Chapter 1 - By Way of Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Phonetic Approach 10
  • Selected References 46
  • Chapter 3 - The Perception of Speech 47
  • Selected References 79
  • Chapter 4- The Statistical Approach 80
  • Selected References 99
  • Chapter 5 - Rules for Using Symbols 100
  • Selected References 118
  • Chapter 6 - Individual Differences 119
  • Selected References 139
  • Chapter 7 - The Verbal Behavior of Children 140
  • Selected References 158
  • Chapter 8 - The Role of Learning 159
  • Selected References 173
  • Chapter 9 - Verbal Habits 174
  • Selected References 198
  • Chapter 10 - Some Effects of Verbal Habits 199
  • Selected References 222
  • Chapter 11 - Words, Sets, and Thoughts 223
  • Selected References 248
  • Chapter 12 - The Social Approach 275
  • Bibliography 276
  • Index 287
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