Shakespeare, Actor-Poet: As Seen by His Associates, Explained by Himself and Remembered by the Succeeding Generation

By Clara Longworth de Chambrun | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
SOURCES OF DOCUMENTATION

Biographical Notices of Fuller, Fulman, Phillips, Aubrey, Winstanley, Langbaine, and Rowe.

IN composing this book, I have only utilized contemporary documents or such as were written long enough ago for their respective authors to have been in touch with men who lived in the dramatist's own time.

They have, I hope, sufficed to call up the personality and surroundings of William Shakespeare, actor, poet, and gentleman, more veraciously, and at the same time more vividly than has been done hitherto. Had I not feared unduly to lengthen this volume in each instance where I have quoted one text, I might have given half a dozen.

A complete list of references accompanies every chapter, this method seeming more precise and practical than a final table. Having seldom interrupted my narrative to discuss certain points at issue among critics, it appears fair to include a comparison of the texts which must necessarily serve all modern biographers but are generally out of reach of the amateur.

No less than six early biographical notices in perfect conformity one with another, but drawn from different sources, define and establish the tradition as we know it.

I have made it a point to accompany each text with precise information concerning each special author, so

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