Shakespeare, Actor-Poet: As Seen by His Associates, Explained by Himself and Remembered by the Succeeding Generation

By Clara Longworth de Chambrun | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
THE EPISTLE DEDICATORIE

To the Right excellent and Honorable Lorde. The Lord Robert Dudley Earle of Leycester, Baron of Denbigh, Knight of the most Noble Order of the Garter, Maister of the Queenes Maiesties horses, and one of hir Graces most Honorable priuie Counsell, Iohn Florio, wisheth all godlie felicitie, continuance of health, increase of Honor, and Grace Eternall.

Right Honorable, when (at the earnest request of diuers Gentilmen my entire friends) I had for the recreation and private exercise drawen out of certaine common questions, and ordinarie aunseres together with diuers prouerbes, sentences and Golden sayings vsed as well in Italian as in English, and therewithall collected and translated out of sundrie the best Italian authours with certaine necessarie rules for Englishmen to attaine to the perfection of the Italian tongue, and for Italians to learne the pronountiation of our englishe. They would needes (though sore against my will) have it putt foorth in Print but I, (Right Honorale) considering the great and manifolde inconvences he hasardes himfelfe vnto, that commiteth anie thing to the open vewe of all men, hauing no worthie Mecoenas to defend him againft the malignant, ready backbiters, a long while I rested as confused and trobled in minde, not knowing whom to finde sufficient, to defend me from fuch inconuentences. At last, calling to remembrance, the Noblenesse of your Honour's minde, I chose you (although presumtiously done of me) as a sufficient ramp to shield me from the battery of such venomous tongues. For knowing by experience your continuall delight in setting foorth of good letters, and ernest zeale in maintaining of languages, I did as it

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Shakespeare, Actor-Poet: As Seen by His Associates, Explained by Himself and Remembered by the Succeeding Generation
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