The Politics of Music in the Third Reich

By Michael Meyer | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONSix
GLOSSARY OF SELECT TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONSxi
INTRODUCTION1
I. 1933--NAZI POWER, PURGES AND REVOLUTIONARY PROMISE19
Gleichschaltung of the Press: An Area that Counted26
Instrumental Music Journalism29
Gleichschaltung of the Academy44
Gleichschaltung of Church Music51
Centralized Control and Manipulated Ideals55
A Singing Ideological Posture62
Segregated Jewish Music73
II. MUSIC ORGANIZATION (1933-1945)89
Propaganda (RMVP) and Culture (RKK)92
Reich Music Chamber (RMK)98
Composers: Supreme Expectations107
The Corporate Body of Musicians111
Concert Management and Promotion114
Romanticism of Steel in Choral and Folk Music115
Music Publishers and Dealers119
RMK Reality and Achievements120
Totalitarian Controls: Other Power Centers125
Musical Foreign Policy142
Music in Occupied Countries180
Means and Ends: The Goebbels-Rosenberg Rivalry188
Some Individuals Portraits193
Organizational Success226
III RACE, FOLK HERO AND THE NEW GERMAN MUSICIAN253
The Musicologist as Myth Maker: Jews and Germans as Ideal Types256
The Myth of the Folk-Musical Community281
Search for the New Music288
The National Socialist Masterwork of the Future297
The New People's Opera308
Anti-Fascist Music: Karl Amadeus Hartmann313
The Fraud of a Music Theory315

-vii-

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The Politics of Music in the Third Reich
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Glossary of Select Terms and Abbreviations xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Endnotes 15
  • 1933: Nazi Power, Purges And Revolutionary Promise 19
  • Endnotes 79
  • Music Organization (1933-1945) 89
  • Race, Folk Hero and the New German Musician 253
  • Endnotes 321
  • Wilhelm Furtwängler: Collaboration And a Struggle of Authority 329
  • Endnotes 388
  • Index 395
  • Ullustrations 417
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