Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

keep us grovelling in the dust, while our enemies will rejoice and say, we do not believe they (colored people!) have any minds; if they have, they are unsusceptible of improvement. My sisters, allow me to ask the question, shall we bring this reproach on ourselves? Doubtless you answer NO, we will strive to avoid it. But hark! methinks I hear the well known voice of Abigail A. Matthews, saying you can avoid it. Why sleep thus? Awake and slumber no more--arise, put on your armor, ye daughters of America, and start forth in the field of improvement. You can all do some good, and if you do but little it will increase in time. The mind is powerful, and by its efforts your influence may be as near perfection, as that of those which have extended over kingdoms, and is applauded by thousands.

Let us accord with that voice which we hear urging us and resolve to adorn our minds with a more abundant supply of those gems for which we have united ourselves--nor let us ever think any occasion too trifling for our best endeavors. It is by constant aiming at perfection in every thing, that we may at length attain to it.■


29 PREJUDICE AGAINST THE COLORED MAN

Theodore S. Wright

As abolitionist societies and ranks grew more numerous in the mid-1830s, serious rifts formed over issues of racial prejudice and social equality. Many who opposed slavery also insisted upon segregation and maintained beliefs in white supremacy.* Black abolitionists spoke out against racism within the movement, especially at antislavery conventions where the nature and purposes of the organizations were under discussion.

At the convention of the New York State Anti-Slavery Society, held in Utica, September 20, 1837, the Reverend Theodore S. Wright, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church in New York City, made two dramatic speeches condemning racial prejudice. In the first he attacked racist thinking present within the abolitionist movement and made it clear that it was not enough just to be against slavery. The second speech followed the introduction of a resolution saying that prejudice against col

____________________
See Leon F. Litwack, "The Abolitionist Dilemma: The Antislavery Movement and the Northern Negro," New England Quarterly 34 ( March 1961), 50-73.

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 926

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.