Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

31 WE MEET THE MONSTER PREJUDICE EVERY WHERE

Clarissa C. Lawrence

On May 1-3, 1839, the third national women's antislavery convention was held in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania Riding School, "no better place being available for so unpopular a gathering," writes Quarles ( Black Abolitionists, 28). At the previous year's convention, white mobs outraged at the gathering of black and white women "sitting together in amalgamated ease" had disrupted the speeches at Pennsylvania Hall, then burned down the building. The mayor of Philadelphia asked Lucretia Mott to ensure that those attending the 1839 convention "avoid unnecessary walking with colored people" and conclude their business as soon as possible.

On May 3, 1839, the last day of the convention, Clarissa C. Lawrence, the president of the Colored Female Religious and Moral Society of Salem (formed by black women in 1833), addressed the gathering. Lawrence had also served as vice president of the Salem Female Anti-Slavery Society, a reorganized and racially integrated version of the Female Anti-Slavery Society of Salem, the earliest known antislavery organization formed by black women, founded February 22, 1832.

Lawrence rose to second the resolution "that henceforth we will increase our efforts to improve the condition of our free colored population, by giving them mechanical, literary, and religious instruction, and assisting to establish them in trades, and such other employments as are now denied them on account of their color." The motion was adopted. The 1839 convention was the last held by the antislavery women, "the time having come for their admission to the hitherto all-male societies" ( Quarles, Black Abolitionists, 28).

While returning from New York on an overnight packet, Lawrence broke the color bar by sharing a cabin with a white woman. A vote taken among the passengers the next day condemned their actions, and proslavery forces created a scandal from the incident, citing it as proof that abolition would promote integration. For an account of the controversy, see the Liberator, May 24 and 31, 1839.

The text of the speech is taken from the Proceedings of the Third Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, Held in Philadelphia, May 1, 2, 3, 1839 ( Philadelphia: Merrihew and Thompson, 1839), 8-9. See also Benjamin Quarles, Black Abolitionists ( New York: Oxford, 1969), 28-29, Dorothy Sterling, ed., We Are Your Sisters: Black Women in the Nineteenth Century ( New York: Norton, 1984), 115-17, and Shirley Yee, BlackWomen Abolitionists: A Study in Activism, 1828-1860

-178-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 926

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.