Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

ready said, we cannot give you the material aid we would wish to, for the reason that our government holds diplomatic relations with Spain. I wish that we had none. . . . If our relations with Spain retard the progress of liberty in Cuba and Porto Rico, I had almost said that I am sorry that we have any. Haiti has disenthralled herself, and with her own strong arm has broken the tyrant's power. All the nations on the American continent have done likewise, and when Cuba shall have succeeded the last foul blot of slavery will be removed from our portion of the globe. Let us pray and work, and success will at last crown our efforts.■


95 THE CIVIL RIGHTS BILL

Robert Browne Elliott

The speeches of the first African American congressional representatives dealt with a wide variety of legislation, but many were appeals for the passage of a civil rights bill introduced by Senator Charles Sumner in Congress in the fall of 1871. Sumner's bill proposed to secure equality of civil rights to African Americans all over the country and prohibited discrimination in railroads, theaters, hotels, schools, cemeteries, and churches and on juries. In February 1875, after Sumner's death, a diluted version of his bill, omitting discrimination in schools and cemeteries, became a law. In 1883 the U.S. Supreme Court declared unconstitutional the Civil Rights Act of 1875.

All seven African American members of the Forty-third Congress spoke in support of the bill during the floor debates. Most recounted personal experiences of discrimination in transportation, accommodation, and dining. Black spectators crowded the gallery to witness the debates.

Robert Browne Elliott ( 1842-1884), a representative from South Carolina, delivered a speech in favor of the civil rights bill in Congress on January 6, 1874. In this speech, reprinted below, Elliott refutes the states' rights doctrine expounded by white southern representatives and grounds his defense of federal actions in the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. His address received national attention.

Elliott was born free in Boston, of West Indian descent. He was educated abroad, first in Jamaica and then in England. He graduated from Eton with honors in 1859. While in England he also studied law and was

____________________
Slavery was not abolished in Cuba until October 7, 1886.

-520-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 926

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.