Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

reports as to the progress of the colored Americans. In the South, where his name is legion, he only needs protection and a little encouragement, to enable him to become a strong tower of defense. Thoroughly American in all his feeling and sympathies, with a willing heart and strong arm, the United States may well be proud of him as a reliable source of strength in time of need. He is accumulating wealth and heaping up stores of knowledge, and his influence is destined to be felt for good for all time to come. Scorning not earning his living by the sweat of his brow, he would encourage that sentiment which seeks to dignify honest labor, not enslave it, and the future will prove the wisdom of his course.

"Let us then be up and doing,
With a heart for any fate;
Still achieving, still pursuing,
Learn to labor and to wait."*


109 NEGRO EDUCATION--ITS HELPS AND HINDRANCES

William H. Crogman

William Henry Crogman ( 1841-1931) was born on the island of St. Martin. Orphaned as a boy, he spent eleven years at sea and voyaged around the world. After the U.S. Civil War, Crogman entered Pierce Academy in Massachusetts. He was a brilliant scholar and in 1868 was named to the English faculty of Claflin College in South Carolina. Two years later, he entered the classical course at Atlanta University and graduated first in his class in 1876. Crogman became professor of classics at Atlanta's Clark University and was named its president in 1903.

Crogman was a nationally renowned lecturer. He was described by William Simmons in Men of Mark ( 1887) as the "master of a clear, elegant style" and as possessing a "vein of natural humor running through his whole discourse" that "gives him power to hold the close attention of his audience to his thoughtful and well balanced addresses" (695-96).

In his address on July 16, 1884, to the predominantly white National Educational Association convention in Madison, Wisconsin, Crogman be-

____________________
From Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, A Psalm of Life ( 1839).

-623-

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