Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

and glorify himself by whatever means he pleases to employ. Should woman be silent in this busy, restless world of missions and vast church enterprises? No! A long, loud No! Give place for her, brethren. Be ready to accept her praying heart, her nimble fingers, her willing hands, her swift feet, her quick eye, her charming voice, the superintendent's chair, the Sunday School teacher's place, the Bible student, the prayer circle, the sick bed, the house of mourning, the foreign mission field, all these are her place.

Dear brethren, point them out, direct my sisters, and help them to work for Christ. My dear sisters, wherever you are, and wherever this paper may be mentioned, remember that there is no department of your life that you can not bend your influence to the benefit of our blessed denomination. Let us take sharpness out of our tongues and put in our pens; take the beauty from our face and put it into our lives; let us love ourselves less and God more; work less for self-aggrandizement, and more for the Church of Christ.

"Do not then stand idly waiting,
For some greater work to do,
Fortune is a lazy goddess--
She will never come to you
.

"Go, and toil in any vineyard,
Do not fear to do and dare;
If you want a field of labor,
You can find it anywhere
."■


118 HOW SHALL WE GET OUR RIGHTS?

Reverend M. Edward Bryant

On December 4, 1887, the African American citizens of Selma, Alabama, celebrated the anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation and the Thirteenth Amendment. The Reverend M. Edward Bryant, an editor and minister of that city, delivered an address that militantly advocated uniting all African Americans in favor of complete freedom. His speech is noteworthy for its emphasis on the need for unity of oppressed people, regardless of color, against their exploiters, for its support of labor unions, and for its call for resistance to violence and for the building of black economic and political power. Bryant identifies

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