Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

The hour is come when a courageous stand must be taken against the ruthless oppressors of our race. We owe it to the thousands who are wearing out a miserable existence under the galling yoke of prejudice and oppression. We owe it to ourselves if we would be true men and not the menials of tyrants. Let us have more self-respect, to be proud of our color and boast of our nationality, at all times to love better than all things colored men and things of our own race. Let us learn to trust those who are honest and capable of leading better than those of other races. Let us use every effort to hurl men, whether they be black or white, from place and power when they fail to subserve our interests and see that we get fair play and equal chance in all the walks of life. I believe that the race is destined to attain a high standing on this continent when colored men learn to stand together, shoulder to shoulder, marching forward proudly to battle for equal rights. Even now the forces are at work beneath the still surface that promise fair in the near future to burst forth like the bright sun, proud monarch of the Heavens at early dawn, dissipating the clouds of darkness, rising higher and higher in his progress in his fiery chariot, sending forth his dazzling rays upon the fields of waving grain, beautiful flowers, the lofty mountain peaks, upon valley, hill and dale, illuminating all nature, making it bright, beautiful and grand, the acknowledged king of day. So this principle of race pride is destined to throw light upon the race and accomplish grand and glorious results. Under its vivifying influence many darkened homes are destined to be made happier, under its magnetic touch the scalding bitter tears of Southern mothers will be dried up. No more will the colored man be looked upon as a thing. No longer will he be spit upon and abused by mean, contemptible and designing men. No more will he be an object of ridicule, scorn and contempt. No more will he be shot down in cold blood for exercising his right of franchise, for the black cloud of prejudice will pass away, for the strong arm of justice, mercy and right will defend and protect him.


120 WOMAN SUFFRAGE

Frederick Douglass

Next to abolition and the battle for equal rights for African Americans. the cause closest to the heart of Frederick Douglass was woman's rights. The masthead of his paper, the North Star, featured the slogan, "Right is of no sex. " Douglass was one of the few men present at the pioneer woman's rights convention held at Seneca Falls, New York, in July 1848, and it was he who persuaded Elizabeth Cady

-687-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 926

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.