Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900

By Philip S. Foner; Robert James Branham | Go to book overview

128
THE INTELLECTUAL PROGRESS OF THE COLORED WOMEN OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION

Fannie Barrier Williams

From 1893 to the beginning of the Great Depression, Fannie Barrier Williams ( 1855-1944) was among the best known African American lecturers and a leader of the women's club movement and various philanthropic causes. Born and raised in Brockport, New York, she graduated from the State Normal School at Brockport in 1870 and studied at the New England Conservatory of Music and Washington's School of Fine Arts. Williams helped found the National League of Colored Women in 1893. In Chicago, she was active in the creation of equal employment opportunities, helping to found Provident Hospital with an integrated medical staff and lobbying local employers to hire African American women as secretaries and clerical staff. After 1900, she and her husband, the lawyer S. Laing Williams, became strong supporters of Booker T. Washington's self-help programs.

Williams was one of six African American women selected to speak before the World's Congress of Representative Women in May 1893 ( Frances Watkins Harper, Anna Julia Cooper, Fannie Jackson Coppin, Sarah J. Woodson Early, and Hallie Quinn Brown also spoke). The congress was part of Chicago's Columbian Exposition, whose American exhibition, housed in the appropriately named "White City," systematically excluded Americans of color. Frederick Douglass and Ida B. Wells were in the Haitian pavilion, where Wells handed out copies of her pamphlet The Reason Why The Colored American is not in the World's Columbian Exposition.

Williams urges the white women in her audience to learn more about black women and the special disabilities they face from racial discrimination. "They are the only women in the country," she reminds her listeners, "for whom real ability, virtue, and special talents count for nothing when they become applicants for respectable employment." Although a few African American women, all of whom had been active in the development of the women's club movement, were permitted to address the World's Congress, considerable tension developed when they sought inclusion in national temperance and women's suffrage campaigns. Thus, as Hazel Carby has written in Reconstructing Womanhood ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), "to appear as a black woman on the platform of the Congress of Representative Women was to be

-761-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lift Every Voice: African American Oratory, 1787-1900
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 926

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.