Psychology and Aging: Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, 1991

By James E. Birren; Martha Storandt et al. | Go to book overview

Memory-Skills Training for Older Adults

Martha Storandt
Washington University, St. Louis

Deficits in memory performance in later life are well documented (e.g., Botwinick, 1984). Further, many older people complain of memory difficulty ( Lowenthal et al., 1967). These deficits and complaints are not to be confused with the severe memory disorders associated with degenerative neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Instead, they are associated with the normal aging process. For most people the ability to learn and remember is just not as good at age 70 as at age 20.

For the past decade researchers have tried to identify ways to help older people cope with their declining memory abilities (e.g., Zarit, Cole, & Guider, 1981; Zarit, Gallagher, & Kramer, 1981). This chapter describes a program of such research involving four studies conducted by the Aging and Development Program at Washington University in St. Louis ( Flynn & Storandt, 1990; Heller, 1989; Hill, Storandt, & Simeone, 1990; Scogin, Storandt, & Lott, 1985). With one exception, this research has used self-instructional training manuals--a form of bibliotherapy. This type of training should be especially helpful to older adults because it is self-paced. It has long been

____________________
Preparation of this chapter was supported in part by training grant AG 00030 from the National Institute on Aging.

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Psychology and Aging: Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, 1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Aging and Slowing Of Behavior: Consequences for Cognition And Survival 1
  • References 33
  • Memory-Skills Training for Older Adults 39
  • References 119
  • Wisdom And Successful Aging 123
  • References 159
  • Trait Psychology Comes of Age 169
  • References 200
  • Natural Cohorts: Family Similarity In Adult Cognition 205
  • References 240
  • Maturing the Study Of Aging: Discussant'S Commentary 245
  • Conclusion 257
  • Subject Index 261
  • Author Index 269
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