Psychology and Aging: Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, 1991

By James E. Birren; Martha Storandt et al. | Go to book overview

tation that this is normative for older adults and by the incentives this creates among adults to instantiate this quality in their life experience.

Finally, stability in personality functioning and intergenerational continuity in cognitive processing may also be fostered by selecting environmental settings that are consistent with one's self- perceptions. Older adults can control and regulate the environmental demands they experience to a greater extent than in earlier years, and they can do so in a way consistent with how they perceive their needs, interests, and capabilities. Few mature adults experience the striking changes in environmental settings and demands that accompany transitions in educational settings, marriage, or early job experience--and few would want to. Instead, part of what contributes to life satisfaction in later adulthood is the construction of environmental settings and demands that are both congenial and consistent with one's self-perceived needs, as Carstensen's research seems to indicate, and this can contribute to the maintenance of stable personality attributes in the adult years. And insofar as early family experience leads to similar self-referent beliefs among family members, family resemblances in different aspects of behavioral functioning may be maintained even though family members move out of the shared home into settings that they construct for themselves--but that have attributes in common.

In the end, these alternative sources of stability and continuity are important to consider because systematically examining these sources is an important next step for research on aging. In some respects, demonstrating that one can show intraindividual stability and intergenerational continuity is less interesting than exploring the conditions in which such consistency is apparent and, conversely, those in which it is absent. The latter provides a means of elucidating the determinants of consistency in behavior and personality in the adult years, and this remains an important challenge for future research on adult development and aging.


Conclusion

Taken together, the contributors to this Nebraska Symposium have provided a far richer picture of aging and its constituents than that revealed by sociocultural norms for later life or conventional wisdom

-257-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychology and Aging: Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, 1991
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Aging and Slowing Of Behavior: Consequences for Cognition And Survival 1
  • References 33
  • Memory-Skills Training for Older Adults 39
  • References 119
  • Wisdom And Successful Aging 123
  • References 159
  • Trait Psychology Comes of Age 169
  • References 200
  • Natural Cohorts: Family Similarity In Adult Cognition 205
  • References 240
  • Maturing the Study Of Aging: Discussant'S Commentary 245
  • Conclusion 257
  • Subject Index 261
  • Author Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.