The Quiet Voices: Southern Rabbis and Black Civil Rights, 1880s to 1990s

By Mark K. Bauman; Berkley Kalin | Go to book overview

A Personal Memoir

MYRON BERMAN

Rabbi and historian Myron Berman identified with the civil rights struggle through early experiences in the North. His most dramatic direct involvement occurred relatively late. A Conservative in Richmond, he served as a Jewish spokesperson and clergyman attempting to bring harmony with justice out of confrontation and to forge personal and professional bonds for progressive growth.

A northerner by birth and through attitudes conveyed by upbringing, I served as rabbi of Temple Beth El in Richmond, Virginia, for twenty- eight years, from 1965 to 1993. Reminiscing about the motivation that led me to a career in the rabbinate, I fondly recall the weekends spent with my grandfather in Temple Gates of Prayer, a Conservative synagogue in a quiet neighborhood in Flushing, New York. My parents, although ethnically oriented, were not particularly observant because of an almost seven-days-a-week commitment to a grocery store in another community. Major factors in stimulating my desire to learn more about Judaism included my affinity for my grandfather and the prestige I felt as a six-year-old attending adult services and the third Sabbath meal. These early years of my life were also influenced by a sexton, the Reverend I. Rosenbaum, who eventually taught me not only the Haftorah and Torah cantillations but also the traditional singing modes of the Sabbath and High Holy Day services.

Perhaps because of these influences and the fact that I lived in a non- Jewish area in another part of Queens, I continued my Jewish studies at the Florence Marshall Hebrew High School. We met for two afternoons a week in the late afternoon and for four hours Sunday morning. All

-311-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Quiet Voices: Southern Rabbis and Black Civil Rights, 1880s to 1990s
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 446

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.