The Quiet Voices: Southern Rabbis and Black Civil Rights, 1880s to 1990s

By Mark K. Bauman; Berkley Kalin | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

Note: I express my appreciation to Berkley Kalin, Bobbie Malone, Abraham Peck, and the anonymous readers of the University of Alabama Press for their insightful comments on this chapter.

1.
See, for example, Tony Martin, The Jewish Onslaught: Despatches from the Wellesley Battlefront ( Dover, Mass.: Majority Press, 1993), and letters to the editor from Harold Brackman (p. 1332) and Eunice G. Pollack and Stephen H. Norwood (pp. 1332-34) in response to the review of Martin's book by Clayborne Carson in Journal of American History 82 ( December 1995). See also Michael M. Cottman, "The Campus 'Radicals': Leonard Jeffries and Other Afrocentric Professors Refuse to Whitewash Their Lesson Plans," Emerge 5 ( February 1994): 26-31.
2.
Arnold Shankman noted for the period from 1880 to 1935, "Evidence indicates that the image of Jews held by Southern blacks was positive. . . . By no means did Jews and Southern blacks have a model relationship, but life in the South during these years was hardly ideal." The title of Shankman's book is indicative. Shankman, Ambivalent Friends: Afro-Americans View the Immigrant (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood, 1982); see also idem, "Friend or Foe? Southern Blacks View the Jew, 1880-1915," in Nathan M. Kaganoff and Melvin I. Urofsky, eds., Turn to the South: Essays on Southern Jewry ( Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia for the American Jewish Historical Society, 1979), 105-23; and idem, "Brothers across the Sea: Afro-Americans on the Persecution of Russian Jews, 1881-1917," Jewish Social Studies 37 (Spring 1975): 114-22; Horace Mann Bond, "Negro Attitudes toward Jews," ibid., 27 ( January 1965); David J. Hellwig, "Black Images of Jews: from Reconstruction to Depression," Societas 8 (Summer 1978); Robert G. Weisbord and Arthur Stein, "Negro Perceptions of Jews Between the World Wars," Judaism 18 ( 1969).
3.
Historians of black-Jewish relations even disagree about definitions vital to an understanding of intergroup relations. Professors Bracey and Meier note, for example, "a mythological tone about what has been called the 'Black-Jewish Alliance'" ( August Meier and John H. Bracey Jr., "The NAACP as a Reform Movement," Journal of Southern History 59 [ February 1993]: 23-24). See also idem, "Towards a Research Agenda on Blacks and Jews in United States History," Journal of American Ethnic History 12 (Spring 1993): 60-67.

-339-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Quiet Voices: Southern Rabbis and Black Civil Rights, 1880s to 1990s
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 446

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.