Eidetic Imagery and Typological Methods of Investigation: Their Importance for the Psychology of Childhood, the Theory of Education, General Psychology, and the Psychophysiology of Human Personality

By E. R. Jaensch; Oscar Oeser | Go to book overview

PART II 1
'NATURALISTIC' AND 'HUMANISTIC' PSYCHOLOGY

AFTER what has been said about psychological methods above, it will be understood why a leading psychiatrist, O. Bumke, believes that he can find more points of contact with the 'humanistic' psychology of E. Spranger, who is of the Dilthey school, than with experimental psychology, which, he thinks, has reached the limits of its usefulness.2 The psychiatrist, like the exponent of 'humanistic' psychology, is always concerned with an individual as a whole, and with different human types, which emerge under such a treatment. Certain deficiencies of experimental psychology, which clung to it in the beginning when its methods were still to a large extent modelled on those of the inorganic sciences, would therefore be noticed most by him. Such deficiencies, from his

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1
"'Naturwissenschaftliche' und 'geisteswissenschaftliche'" Psychologie.
2
O. Bumke, "Psychologie und Psychiatrie," Klinische Wochenschrift. 1922.--Postscript: While reading this essay for the last time, I had an opportunity of discussing these questions with Geheimrat Bumke. Our views were in complete agreement. O. Bumke repudiates most strongly any assertion that he is antagonistic to experimental psychology. But he shares our view that through having been occupied for too long with psychophysics, and remaining attached in too one-sided a fashion to a purely physical point of view, psychology has not really touched upon the questions of the inner psychic life. It has therefore fulfilled only a very small part of the hopes, which psychiatry had placed on it. Now it is precisely our view that it is not permissible to transpose the methods of physics into psychology without adaptation, and our 'typological method' is an attempt to make this necessary adaptation. In these pages we have tried to present this method, which enables us to bridge the gulf between naturalistic, experimental psychology and humanistic psychology.

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