Classifying Reactions to Wrongdoing: Taxonomies of Misdeeds, Sanctions, and Aims of Sanctions

By R. Murray Thomas | Go to book overview

"What the woman really needs is intensive psychotherapy and training for a legitimate occupation, but that's impossible in the present underfunded correctional system. So the only thing to do is lock her up so she can't do any more harm to society, even though that's not going to do her any good."

"Having him stay after school for a couple of weeks may be a good idea, but who is going to stay there to watch him? His teacher has to get home to care for her family."

A-7.5. Other (describe).

CONCLUSION
The following are characteristics of this chapter's taxonomy of aims:
1.The aims are not mutually exclusive. Instead, they often overlap and are interlinked.
2.Some aims represent more general, overarching purposes than others and thus can subsume the others.
3. Often a single sanction can accomplish more than one aim. 4. Although the taxonomy is considered broad ranging, in that it covers a wide diversity of aims that underlie sanctions and treatments, it is not viewed as definitive. There are likely additional aims toward which sanctions are directed.

-126-

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Classifying Reactions to Wrongdoing: Taxonomies of Misdeeds, Sanctions, and Aims of Sanctions
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles In Contributions in Psychology ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1- Characteristics of Taxonomies 1
  • Conclusion 18
  • 2- Conceptualizing Wrongdoing 21
  • Conclusion 48
  • 3- Classifying Misdeeds 49
  • Conclusion 53
  • 4- Modes of Reasoning About Aims and Sanctions 55
  • Conclusion 76
  • 5- Foundations of an Aims Taxonomy 77
  • Conclusion 113
  • 6- Types of Aims 115
  • Conclusion 126
  • 7- Foundations of a Sanctions Taxonomy 127
  • Conclusion 178
  • 8: Types of Sanctions 179
  • 9- Applications 193
  • Conclusion 201
  • References 203
  • Index 211
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