Country Squire in the White House

By John T. Flynn | Go to book overview

subjects like old-age pensions, labor laws, etc., they were far from pleased with him. They feared him. They did not like the way he had played along with the corrupt Tammany machine in New York--only to lose its votes in the end. Mostly they felt he had exhibited a very disturbing lack of force, or willingness to battle for things, a tendency to compromise. Those who were with him were with him with many reservations.

His subordinates and department heads found him hesitant, evasive, difficult to follow. They never quite knew where he stood, when he was really behind them, when he might step away. There is no doubt that his habit was to seek to please everyone, to court everybody's approval. Every caller went away feeling he had a friend in the governor who was in agreement with him. The stories on this point are well authenticated and innumerable. One well-known reporter, friendly to Roosevelt, wrote: "Those having dealings with him find the effusiveness of his good will a hindrance, for they often leave a meeting with the impression that he is committed to one policy only to find that he advocates its opposite." It is very difficult to find any of those who served under him as governor who do not hold this view.


III
Building the New Deal

AS THE DATE for the conventions in 1932 approached, the imperious issue that commanded everyone's attention was the depression. It was apparent that the country had lost faith in Hoover and that it was looking for a new savior. All sorts of men with all sorts of plans, programs and panaceas were contesting for public approval. And Roose

-47-

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Country Squire in the White House
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A Warning v
  • Contents vi
  • I - A Tide and a Name 1
  • III - Building the New Deal 25
  • IV - The Crisis 47
  • V- The New Deal--Second Edition 68
  • VI - Roosevelt's Big Gun 71
  • VII - The President Goes to War 90
  • VIII - The White House, Inc. 98
  • IX - The Politician of the Lord 107
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