Country Squire in the White House

By John T. Flynn | Go to book overview

the Howe speech. It was a difficult moment for him. Which should he deliver? He had read and corrected the Moley speech. He had not even seen the Howe speech. He was about to accept a call to lead the Democratic party with that speech. He did a thoroughly characteristic Roosevelt thing. He began to read. Moley, sitting in the convention, was horrified to hear strange sentences that were not in the speech he had written. Roosevelt was reading the Howe speech. Having read almost the whole of its first page, he then went on with the Moley speech.

From all this we may begin to form a fairly definite picture of the man who became President of the United States and upon whose mind poured all the difficult problems of meeting one of the great economic crises in our history. One thing stands out with striking clarity--that in a great economic crisis there came to leadership a man who was never in the slightest degree interested in economic problems, had no understanding of them and who in a grave financial crisis had no interest in or understanding of the problems of finance. It helps us to understand why at a later period he could propose building fifty thousand airplanes that would cost seven billion dollars and say to the country that the means of raising the money was a minor detail.


IV
The Crisis

IN WHAT FOLLOWS HERE there will be no point in pursuing the events of the next seven years in chronological order. It will add to clarity if we follow them according to the phases and topics as they develop.

As Roosevelt came into power, the crisis intervened--a

-68-

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Country Squire in the White House
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A Warning v
  • Contents vi
  • I - A Tide and a Name 1
  • III - Building the New Deal 25
  • IV - The Crisis 47
  • V- The New Deal--Second Edition 68
  • VI - Roosevelt's Big Gun 71
  • VII - The President Goes to War 90
  • VIII - The White House, Inc. 98
  • IX - The Politician of the Lord 107
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