Country Squire in the White House

By John T. Flynn | Go to book overview

And then an election approaches. Americans are thinking of the eleven million people still unemployed, of the farm problem unsolved; of the utter paralysis of private investment, of the mounting public debt, of the scandals in Washington and local political machines and a score of other counts in the indictment by Roosevelt's political foes. And the war, the menace to our security, the call to national defense--all this will take the minds of our people off the failure to solve our own problems and will furnish a new excuse to spend another ten or fifteen billion dollars to return his party to power.

What is more serious than all this, of course, is that the President has been "meddling in" on the European situation for two years, and is increasing his meddling. While proclaiming himself the true neutral, he has been inching the country more and more toward active support of the two great empires. He is now the recognized leader of the war party. There is not the slightest doubt that the only thing that now prevents his active entry on the side of the Allies is his knowledge that he cannot take the American people in yet. He has said privately that he does not want to send men, will, in fact, never do it. If he went in, it would be merely with naval and air forces and with munitions and supplies. This, of course, is another example of the President's method of halfway thinking. Imagine this country going to war and then refusing to supply men to do the fighting!


VIII
The White House, Inc.

IT IS NOT POSSIBLE to omit a consideration of certain personal elements. The President's family has been greatly

-107-

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Country Squire in the White House
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • A Warning v
  • Contents vi
  • I - A Tide and a Name 1
  • III - Building the New Deal 25
  • IV - The Crisis 47
  • V- The New Deal--Second Edition 68
  • VI - Roosevelt's Big Gun 71
  • VII - The President Goes to War 90
  • VIII - The White House, Inc. 98
  • IX - The Politician of the Lord 107
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