Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"

By Tamae K. Prindle | Go to book overview

meaning than its own. Maybe it's because I went through such a hardship during the war. All I want to do now is to get to the top of the stairs in front of me, leaping two steps at a time. It doesn't matter if I stumble and get hurt. The injury will give me a sense of living."

"The MADE IN JAPAN dream must be waiting for you at the very top of the stairs."

"You may be right."

Tomoko's eyes sparkled mischievously. "Let me ask you one final question. Did you lose this game?"

The fire in the electric furnace of his factory, now reduced in size, and the fire arrows shivering forlornly, floated before Fujishita's eyes, but his words came out strong, "What is it to lose?"

"You still don't know?" Tomoko grinned, her eyelashes shining with raindrops.

A whistle split the thick air. A freighter, which had been moored in the dock, slowly turned its bow in departure.

"To lose is to become an Ippatsuya," Fujishita asserted to the damp wet sky.


Notes

This short story was originally published in the February 1959 issue of All Reading (Ōru yomimono). This is a translation of "Meido in Japan" in Sōkaiya Kinjō, pp. 109-56.

1.
Ippatsu means "one shot," ya means a "shop" or a "dealer," the combination means something like "a one shot dealer" or "a gambler who takes chances in business activities."
2.
The "san" suffix means "Mr.," "Mrs.," or "Miss." it may follow either the first or last name. Where the "-san" suffix is used slightly differently from its English counterparts, I left it untranslated.
3.
"Blanks" are unfinished products.
4.
The rising sun is the design on the Japanese flag. A sleeve strap (tasuki) is a circular cloth strap put around both arms in a figure "8" from behind to keep Japanese sleeves from getting in the way.

-32-

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Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Made in Japan 3
  • Notes 32
  • Silver Sanctuary 33
  • Notes 57
  • Kinjō the Corporate Bouncer 58
  • Notes 90
  • Notes 110
  • From Paris Ryō Takasugi 111
  • Notes 128
  • The Baby Boom Generation 129
  • Part 2 148
  • Part 3 155
  • Part 3 164
  • Giants and Toys Takeshi Kaikō 165
  • Notes 202
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