Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"

By Tamae K. Prindle | Go to book overview

Notes

The word sōkaiya is translated as "corporate bouncer" by Newsweek ( August 11, 1986). Newswek cites Tokyo Electric Power Co., Meiji Confectionery, and Mitsubishi Bank as examples of companies that used corporate bouncers in their shareholders' general meetings. It reports that open payments to corporate bouncers ended in 1982, but there are still 1,400 active corporate bouncers by police count. By Newswek's definition, these people "have managed to feed off Japan's largest corporations by playing one or both sides of a narrow street. Either they've threatened to dig up company scandals and irregularities by asking embarrassing questions at stockholders' meetings or they've taken the company side, offering to shout down--or even beat up-- anyone who might try to challenge management." This is a translation of " Sōkaiya Kinjō" from Saburō Shiroyama Sōkaiya Kinjō ( Tokyo: Shinchō Bunko, 1963). Although sōkaiya is a Japanese word and denotes both singular and plural forms, I added the English plural suffix "s" to this word when it is to be construed as plural.

1.
Taigin is a shortened name for Taiyō Ginkō, meaning the Taiyō Bank.
2.
About 100 thousand dollars.
3.
In some business contexts the "-san" suffix shows intimacy between the speaker and the addressee (or the referent), or recognition by the speaker of his own higher status than that of the addressee (or the referent). If the addressee's (or the referent's) status is higher, the speaker is likely to suffix the addressee's (or the referent's) name with his professional title or "sensei."
4.
The entirety of this quotation comes from: Japan Commercial Law Service, Commercial Laws of Japan ( Florida: Foreign Tax Law Association, Inc., 1987), 58-6.
5.
"-kun" is suffixed to either the first or the last name, and most commonly means "Mr." Most often, the addressee (or the referent) is a male who is younger or lower ranked than the speaker.
6.
Yakuza are members of Mafia-like brotherhood organizations.
7.
Devas are the four warrior gods who protect the entrances of temples.
8.
Usually, a Japanese house has a cement area called genkan to take shoes off; the living area beyond it is slightly elevated.
9.
This refers to the episode gossiped over by the sōkaiya attendants on page 59.
10.
Sensei usually means "teacher," and is also used as a title for teachers, in such a way as Suzuki-sensei (Mr. Suzuki). However, politicians, writers, and other professionals are also addressed or referred to by this honorific title.
11.
Moxa cautery or okyū is a relative of acupunture. Small piles of moxa herb are laid on medically designated spots on the body and burned by incense.
12.
The geisha's name relates to Ono no Komachi, a ninth-century poetess, known for her good looks.

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Made in Japan 3
  • Notes 32
  • Silver Sanctuary 33
  • Notes 57
  • Kinjō the Corporate Bouncer 58
  • Notes 90
  • Notes 110
  • From Paris Ryō Takasugi 111
  • Notes 128
  • The Baby Boom Generation 129
  • Part 2 148
  • Part 3 155
  • Part 3 164
  • Giants and Toys Takeshi Kaikō 165
  • Notes 202
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.