Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"

By Tamae K. Prindle | Go to book overview

From Paris Ryō Takasugi

I

Matsuoka sat relaxed, with his feet propped up on his desk and the soles of his shoes facing Komiya. "I just got a telex from our Tokyo Main Office. It says that the Queen is coming to Paris later next week. Luckily she'll only be here for three days this time. It won't be too bad. I hope you can handle it. She's supposed to go to London from here. She has two others with her."

"No problem. Three days will be manageable. Last time was rough; she stayed for a week and a half!" Komiya's Westerner-like face cracked into a smile from relief rather than joy.

"She's fond of you. The crank may be coming to Europe mostly to see you." Matsuoka looked up at Komiya, flashing a grin.

"Please! You don't have to rub it in!"

"Settle down. You can't be all that unhappy having a VIP chase you, I guess women fall apart at the sight of a good-looking man no matter how old they are. Or is it your Français that's gotten her hooked?"

"That's enough! This is no spring chicken we're talking about. 1 The woman must be sixty, a granny. She makes me sick." Komiya scowled in disgust. In fact, the memory of the overperfumed, heavily made-up woman could make him cry. Komiya was embarassed to be seen in her company, although there was no denying that someone else might call her adorable. Everything was a matter of preference. It wasn't as if she didn't have her cute side. She even had something rather childish about her.

-111-

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Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Made in Japan 3
  • Notes 32
  • Silver Sanctuary 33
  • Notes 57
  • Kinjō the Corporate Bouncer 58
  • Notes 90
  • Notes 110
  • From Paris Ryō Takasugi 111
  • Notes 128
  • The Baby Boom Generation 129
  • Part 2 148
  • Part 3 155
  • Part 3 164
  • Giants and Toys Takeshi Kaikō 165
  • Notes 202
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