Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"

By Tamae K. Prindle | Go to book overview

Fukushima had vacillated about this appointment. He had also visited Tomita twice for consultation since his first return from the northeast.

"My wife won't have it . . . ," he once said.

Tomita knew that Fukushima's wife was a good-looking woman who had graduated from a Christian college in Tokyo. She was not the type to humor uneducated housewives as the mistress of a small retail store.

"I don't think I can do it," he kept whimpering at another time. "I'm training at a supermarket now but I can't memorize the names of the merchandise. I'm all thumbs when it comes to wrapping things. When a man reaches thirty-eight years old, I'm afraid both his brains and hands slow down."

It was obvious that the economist, who had spent many years at A- Electric as an accountant, had lost his aptitude for manual labor. It was impressive that Fukushima didn't leave the company.

"My wife gave in. We shall see what we can do. If I do well, they may put me back in the Main Office. If things go wrong, they'll replace me soon enough," said Fukushima, trying to sound hopeful. "When it comes right down to it, starvation is worse than shame." He smiled sadly.

To Tomita's eyes, Fukushima's bloodless face, as he stood rigid on the platform, was proof of this last sentence.

What a dull celebration this is! Tomita was beginning to feel weighted down.

Yoshifuji stood next to Tomita, wearing an extra-large red man-made flower on his chest. He curried favor with guests who were going home early.

"What do you know! We're embarrassed to get in this silly business, but it doesn't mean we are forgetting our proper trade. . . ." Yoshifuji was talking to an elderly man, most likely an executive in a large company. A ribbon with "A-Electric CS Chain Company, Vice-President" dangled below his large man-made flower. He was now the vice- president of the wholesale company for the convenience stores.


PART 4

I

"I'm sure you aren't all that keen about it, but please agree to do this, Tomita-kun." President Ohkura lowered his huge bald head, although only slightly.

-155-

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Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Made in Japan 3
  • Notes 32
  • Silver Sanctuary 33
  • Notes 57
  • Kinjō the Corporate Bouncer 58
  • Notes 90
  • Notes 110
  • From Paris Ryō Takasugi 111
  • Notes 128
  • The Baby Boom Generation 129
  • Part 2 148
  • Part 3 155
  • Part 3 164
  • Giants and Toys Takeshi Kaikō 165
  • Notes 202
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