Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"

By Tamae K. Prindle | Go to book overview

Giants and Toys
Takeshi Kaikō

I

The Samson's Candies building is located in the center of Tokyo. Because it faces a train station, throngs of people walk through its front yard during commuter hours. Also, because the station exit is clogged with cars, Samson's front yard serves as a station plaza, a buffer zone. This piece of land is valuable, but is made available by the company as a sidewalk. The sidewalk runs right along the front windows. Behind the glass panels is a huge display chamber. It shows all year round countless kinds of Samson products, ranging from chewing gum to marrons glacés. Pedestrians are bound to peek in the window as they walk by. In other words, it is for advertisement purposes that Samson offers its plaza to the public. The sidewalk is comfortably spacious and roofed. Many benches and flower beds give it the feeling of a small park. Samson's architectural layout also conveniently frees the neighborhood from pedestrian congestion caused by the station. For this reason, Samson sits well with the area.

I have a full view of the plaza from my office window on the second floor. People float outside the glass wall day and night, like a rolling ocean. Twice daily, large currents go up and down. These are the sad processions of commuters. The walkers' heads always hang down, because the sun is too bright in the morning, and the people are hungry and tired in the evening. Only their legs are restlessly busy. As they are vomited out of old iron boxes, they drift in unison into this plaza, pace along the glass wall, and are quietly siphoned into various colored

-165-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Made in Japan 3
  • Notes 32
  • Silver Sanctuary 33
  • Notes 57
  • Kinjō the Corporate Bouncer 58
  • Notes 90
  • Notes 110
  • From Paris Ryō Takasugi 111
  • Notes 128
  • The Baby Boom Generation 129
  • Part 2 148
  • Part 3 155
  • Part 3 164
  • Giants and Toys Takeshi Kaikō 165
  • Notes 202
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.