Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"

By Tamae K. Prindle | Go to book overview

manpower go to? Did we leave only an elusive shadow in the dim consciousness of children, and nothing else?

I smoked by the window, tasting a tremendous amount of wasted effort. A noise made me turn around. It was Aida standing at the doorway. He grinned tightly on seeing me but walked in without a word. He was neither drunk nor spent to death. He tossed his flax suit on top of his desk, pulled down his trousers, and kept only his undershirt and underpants on. What he pulled out, under the light, from the glass cabinet, gave me a wretched pang. He put on a silver suit with a bright emblem of a giant on its chest.

"Wow! Great! This fits me perfectly!" He then put on the plastic helmet. "I'm going to walk around in these!" He shouted merrily inside the space helmet, flipped the antennas two or three times, and circled around the room.

I got up from my seat and went to the hallway, leaving him in the office by himself Aida's loud voice, asking the weather bureau by telephone about tomorrow's weather, chased after me. By the time I started walking down the stairs, the voice had turned to sad laughter. As I walked in darkness, it dawned on me that there was only one instance in my life when all my power crystallized. It was only once, but it was critical. When I saw the hat flattened in the middle of the road, I was all for throwing my body on the pavement. At that time, I wanted to hear my own shriek and the sound of my cracking skull. I crawled out of the dead cement and scampered into the crowd in the polluted August night.


Notes

This story was originally published in a monthly magazine, World of Literature (Bungakukai), October 1957. This is a translation of "Kyōjin to omacha" in Collected Works of Takeshi Kaikō: Novels 2 (Kaikō Takeshi zen sakuhin-shū: Shōsetsu 2) ( Tokyo: Shinchō-sha, 1973), pp. 72-110.

1.
Kun in this case means "Mr." with a sense of intimacy.
2.
The Osaka dialect is more blunt, yet friendlier than standard Japanese.
3.
Kappa, translated as water imp, is an imaginary animal that lives in water. It has a dish on top of its head, hair around it, a human-like but scaled green body with webbed fingers, and a large, beaked mouth.
4.
Renkyū, or the Golden Week, occurs when a weekend comes close to a national holiday, creating consecutive holidays.
5.
Anko is cooked lentil beans sweetened with a lot of sugar.
6.
The Meiji era was from 1868 to 1912 and the Taishū era was from 1912 to 1926.
7.
Miso is salty beanpaste and takuan is pickled long radish.
8.
Katakana is an alphabet often used to phoneticize foreign words.

-202-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Made in Japan and Other Japanese "Business Novels"
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xvii
  • Made in Japan 3
  • Notes 32
  • Silver Sanctuary 33
  • Notes 57
  • Kinjō the Corporate Bouncer 58
  • Notes 90
  • Notes 110
  • From Paris Ryō Takasugi 111
  • Notes 128
  • The Baby Boom Generation 129
  • Part 2 148
  • Part 3 155
  • Part 3 164
  • Giants and Toys Takeshi Kaikō 165
  • Notes 202
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.