Separation of Powers--Does it Still Work?

By Robert A. Goldwin; Art Kaufman | Go to book overview

8
In Defense of Separation of Powers

James W. Ceaser

It is with infinite caution that any man ought to venture upon pulling down an edifice which has answered in any tolerable degree for ages the common purposes of society.

EDMUND BURKE

Only once in recent history has a major democratic regime changed its basic institutional structure with the clear aim of remaining a democracy. That change occurred in France in 1958, when Parliament could not form an effective government in the face of the Algerian crisis and the imminent threat of a military coup. While Parliament fiddled, Paris nearly burned. France had lost the sine qua non of any functioning government: the power--let us call it, with John Locke, the "executive power"--to act with energy and discretion to save the nation from conquest or disintegration. To remedy this fatal flaw, the founders of the Fifth French Republic, drawing heavily on the American presidential model of government, instituted a unitary and independent executive elected outside Parliament and endowed by the constitution with a broad grant of power. The new office was designed to ensure that there would always be a force to act for the state, even in the event of a stalemate among the political parties on the normal policies of governing. The nation's heart would never cease to beat. 1

Today in the United States several prominent persons are urging the American people to undertake a similiar act of constitution making. Oddly enough, however, while many in this group proclaim their desire to strengthen the executive office, they are recommending the opposite course from that taken in France in 1958; they are calling for a change from a presidential (or separation of powers) system to something akin to a parliamentary system. They propose this change not because the United States faces an immediate crisis but because the government does not function as well as it might--because, in Lloyd Cutler's words, we are unable to "'form a Government' [that can]

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Separation of Powers--Does it Still Work?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • The Editors and the Authors vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - To Form a Government 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Political Parties and the Separation of Powers 18
  • Notes 36
  • 3 - The Renewal of American Constitutionalism 38
  • Conclusion 60
  • Notes 62
  • 4 - The Separation of Powers and Modern Forms of Democratic Government 65
  • Conclusions 83
  • Notes 85
  • 5 - The Separation of Powers Needs Major Revision 90
  • Conclusion 113
  • 6 - The Separation of Powers and Foreign Affairs 118
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - A 1787 Perspective on Separation of Powers 138
  • 8 - In Defense of Separation of Powers 168
  • Notes 191
  • A Note on the Book 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 196

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.