Narratology: An Introduction

By Susana Onega; Jose Angel Garcia Landa | Go to book overview

the moral under the aspect of the aesthetic? And could we answer that question without giving a narrative account of the history of objectivity itself, an account that would already prejudice the outcome of the story we would tell in favor of the moral in general?

Could we ever narrativize without moralizing?


Notes
1.
ROLAND BARTHE, "'Introduction to the Structural Analysis of Narratives,'" Image, Music, Text, trans. Stephen Heath ( New York, 1977), p. 79.
2.
The words 'narrative,' 'narration,' 'to narrate,' and so on derive via the Latin gnārus ('knowing,' 'acquainted with,' 'expert,' 'skilful,' and so forth) and narrō ('relate,' 'tell') from the Sanskrit root gnâ ('know'). The same root yields γνώριμος ('knowable,' 'known'): see EMILE BOISACQ, Dictionnaire étymologique de la langue grecque ( Heidelberg, 1950), under the entry for this word. My Thanks to Ted Morris of Cornell, one of our great etymologists.
3.
GÉRARD GENETTE, "'Boundaries of Narrative,'" New Literary History 8.1 (Autumn 1976):11.
4.
EMILE BENVENISTE as quoted by Genette, "'Boundaries of Narrative,'" p. 9. Cf. BENVENISTE, Problems in General Linguistics, trans. Mary Elizabeth Meek ( Coral Gables, Fla., 1971), p. 208.
5.
See LOVIS O. MINK, "'Narrative Form as a Cognitive Instrument,'" and LIONEL GOSSMAN , "'History and Literature,'" in The Writing of History. Literary Form and Historical Understanding, ed. Robert H. Canaryand Henry Kozicki ( Madison, Wis., 1978), with complete bibliography on the problem of narrative form in historical writing.
6.
I discuss Croce in Metahistory: The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth Century Europe ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1973), pp. 381-5.
7.
PETER GAY, Style in History ( New York, 1974), p. 189.
8.
G. W. F. HEGEL, The Philosophy of History, trans. J. Sibree ( New York, 1956), pp. 60-1.
9.
La cronica di Dino Compagni delle cose occorrenti ne'tempi suoi e La canzone morale Del Pregio dello stesso autore, ed. Isidore Del Lungo, 4th edn rev. ( Florence, 1902). Cf. HARRY ELMER BARNES, A History of Historical Writing ( New York, 1962), pp. 80-1.
10.
Ibid. p. 5: my translations.
11.
See FRANK KERMODE, The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction ( Oxford, 1967), chap. 1.

-285-

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