Postcolonial Theory: A Critical Introduction

By Leela Gandhi | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I wish to thank my colleagues at the School of English, La Trobe University, for their patience and support, and Elizabeth Weiss and others at Allen & Unwin for their advice and enthusiasm. Thanks also to Dipesh Chakrabarty who gave me access to his work and helped to shape ideas, to David Lloyd whose writing, likewise, offered crucial insights into the 'problem' of anti-colonial nationalisms, and to Ruth Vanita whose polemical and stimulating resistance to the claims of postcolonial theory finds utterance in the 'critique' aspect of this book.

I have gained enormously from conversations with Marion Campbell, Joanne Finkelstein, Raju Pandey and Sanjay Seth, who were generous with their time and friendship. To Bronte Adams I owe profound thanks for her reservoir of faith and encouragement; she brought, as always, both pleasure and perspective to the activity of reading and writing.

My greatest debt is to Pauline Nestor, who read through this manuscript and its drafts with care and patience. I learnt much from her editorial and critical interventions, and her hospitality and support considerably eased the rough passage of this book.

-vii-

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Postcolonial Theory: A Critical Introduction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface viii
  • 1 - After Colonialism 1
  • 2 - Thinking Otherwise: a Brief Intellectual History 23
  • 3 - Postcolonialism and the New Humanities 42
  • 4 - Edward Said and His Critics 64
  • 5 - Postcolonialism and Feminism 81
  • 6 - Imagining Community: the Question of Nationalism 102
  • 7 - One World: the Vision of Postnationalism 122
  • 8 - Postcolonial Literatures 141
  • 9 - The Limits of Postcolonial Theory 167
  • Bibliography 177
  • Index 189
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