The Hound of the Baskervilles: Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

the reverential way in which Lestrade gazed at my companion that he had learned a good deal since the days when they had first worked together. I could well remember the scorn which the theories of the reasoner used then to excite in the practical man.

'Anything good?' he asked.

'The biggest thing for years,' said Holmes. 'We have two hours before we need think of starting. I think we might employ it in getting some dinner, and then, Lestrade, we will take the London fog out of your throat* by giving you a breath of the pure night air of Dartmoor. Never been there? Ah, well, I don't suppose you will forget your first visit.'


· CHAPTER 14 · The Hound of the Baskervilles

ONE of Sherlock Holmes's defects--if, indeed, one may call it a defect--was that he was exceedingly loth to communicate his full plans to any other person until the instant of their fulfilment. Partly it came no doubt from his own masterful nature, which loved to dominate and surprise those who were around him. Partly also from his professional caution, which urged him never to take any chances. The result, however, was very trying for those who were acting as his agents and assistants. I had often suffered under it, but never more so than during that long drive in the darkness. The great ordeal was in front of us; at last we were about to make our final effort, and yet Holmes had said nothing, and I could only surmise what his course of action would be. My nerves thrilled with anticipation when at last the cold wind upon our faces and the dark, void spaces on either side of the narrow road told me that we were back upon the moor once again. Every stride of the horses and

-146-

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The Hound of the Baskervilles: Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Hound of the Baskervilles i
  • Oxford World''s Classics ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor''s Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxx
  • Select Bibliography xxxi
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xxxvii
  • Chapter 1- Mr Sherlock Holmes 3
  • Chapter 2- The Curse of the Baskervilles 9
  • Chapter 5- Three Broken Threads 41
  • Chapter 7- The Stapletons of Merripit House 61
  • Chapter 8- First Report of Dr Watson 75
  • Chapter 9- The Light upon the Moor 82
  • Chapter 10- Extract from the Diary of Dr Watson 99
  • Chapter 11- The Man on the Tor 109
  • Chapter 12- Death on the Moor 122
  • Chapter 13- Fixing the Nets 136
  • Chapter 14- The Hound of the Baskervilles 146
  • Chapter 15- A Retrospection 157
  • Explanatory Notes 169
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