Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy

By F. M. Kamm | Go to book overview

letting someone die, and this helps account for these cases' being almost as permissible as letting someone die is. But then Thomson's argument should be supplemented by something like Condition 3, which emphasizes the definitional property of letting someone die: that someone loses life that would be the result of being aided.

If Thomson's argument is not supplemented in this way, her reason for permitting the violinist to be killed will not differentiate between killing him when he uses your body and receives life support, and killing him when he uses your body but does not receive life support. In the latter case we might want to kill the violinist in order to stop making efforts that we need not make in order to save his life, even though our efforts are not now saving his life. Yet it may be that (as I have argued) for efforts of a certain magnitude, it is more difficult to justify causing someone to lose his life that he would have had independently of those efforts than to cause him to lose what he has because of those efforts and would not have had without them.


Notes
1.
Here the direct effect of the imposition is considered to be the effect of the imposition itself, independent of its success. That is, it is independent of whether the violinist lives or dies. In other variations, one might assume that it is the effect of the imposition plus the achieved aim (the violinist's surviving) that causes further problems for you.
2.
It was a conflicting view, that we could harm an innocent to stop aftereffects, that I defended in "The Insanity Defense."
3.
David Wasserman helped separate my cases into classes.
4.
As I was reminded by Seana Shiffrin.
5.
Indeed, I believe that this reasoning anticipates Thomson's analyses of the trolley problem, in "The Trolley Problem", Yale Law Journal 94( 1985):1395- 1415.
6.
However, in connection with the second difference, suppose that someone else would have offered a coat had Smith not already had Jones's on. I do not believe that the fact that if we take away Jones's coat from Smith, Smith would then be worse off than he would have been if he had never had Jones's coat affects whether we may take it away. The reason is that in this case, it is not Jones who offered or is otherwise causally responsible for the use of his coat, and so Jones is not responsible for interfering with other offers that Smith might

-76-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - May We Kill in Nonabortion Cases? 20
  • Notes 39
  • 2 - Applying the Argument to Specific Nonabortion Cases 42
  • Notes 63
  • 3 - Variations and Alternatives 64
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - May We Kill in Abortion Cases? 78
  • Notes 120
  • 5 - Creating Responsibly 124
  • Notes 182
  • 6 - Informed Consent, Responsibilities in Pregnancy, and External Means of Gestation 186
  • Notes 218
  • Index 221
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.