CHAPTER XV

Nor often does the whole population of a city fall into a complete frenzy of fear, irritation and breathless haste; but that was what happened to the inhabitants of Boston when Howe made public announcement that the town must be evacuated.

Never before, certainly, had Boston seen such an array of vessels as thronged the waterfront, from Copp's Hill to Long Wharf. They lay against the docks as tightly as they could be packed-- schooners, brigs, snows, sloops and little sharp-ended pinks. Their masts were like a forest, as uncountable as the sparrows that roosted at night in the ivy of King's Chapel: scores upon scores upon scores of them--more than I had ever before seen in my whole life.

Thanks to Benjamin Thompson's warning, the few odds and ends we had brought into Boston from Milton were corded up and ready to go before the official announcement of the evacuation was made, and they seemed infinitesimal by comparison with the belongings Mrs. Byles designed to take with her. Her boxes, portmanteaus, sacks, packages and paper-wrapped parcels contained, simply, everything she owned. She was even ambitious of taking aboard ship the tall clock showing the moon's changes which had belonged to her grandfather Barrell.

She rooted out things she couldn't have seen for twenty years-- pincushions, brooches of braided hair from the heads of favorite nieces who now were mothers, lace mitts in need of mending, mobcaps yellowed with age, mirrors, lectures written by her husband, from which she read snatches to us, unconsciously revealing that Belcher Byles' philosophical musings in the classroom were less

-139-

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Oliver Wiswell
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Book I - Boston 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter II 9
  • Chapter III 21
  • Chapter IV 34
  • Chapter V 47
  • Chapter VI 55
  • Chapter VII 64
  • Chapter VIII 70
  • Chapter IX 81
  • Chapter X 90
  • Chapter XI 100
  • Chapter XII 109
  • Chapter XIII 114
  • Chapter XIV 125
  • Chapter XV 139
  • Chapter XVI 148
  • Chapter XVII 159
  • Book II - New York 165
  • Chapter XVIII 167
  • Chapter XIX 174
  • Chapter XX 179
  • Chapter XXI 183
  • Chapter XXII 187
  • Chapter XXIII 198
  • Chapter XXIV 207
  • Chapter XXV 217
  • Chapter XXVI 230
  • Chapter XXVII 239
  • Chapter XXVIII 247
  • Chapter XXIX 257
  • Chapter XXXI 273
  • Chapter XXXII 282
  • Chapter XXXIII 290
  • Chapter XXXIV 297
  • Chapter XXXV 307
  • Chapter XXXVI 313
  • Chapter XXXVII 319
  • Chapter XXXVIII 328
  • Chapter Xxxix 336
  • Chapter XL 345
  • Chapter XLI 352
  • Chapter XLII 366
  • Chapter XLIII 375
  • Chapter XLIV 384
  • Chapter XLV 394
  • Chapter XLVI 404
  • Book III - Paris 413
  • Chapter XLVII 415
  • Chapter XLVIII 422
  • Chapter Xlix 430
  • Chapter LI 446
  • Chapter LII 455
  • Chapter LIII 464
  • Chapter Liv 473
  • Chapter LV 483
  • Chapter LVI 504
  • Chapter LVII 510
  • Chapter LVIII 515
  • Chapter LIX 523
  • Chapter LX 534
  • Book IV - The Wilderness Trail 543
  • Chapter LXI 545
  • Chapter LXII 553
  • Chapter LXIII 560
  • Chapter LXIV 567
  • Chapter LXV 577
  • Chapter LXVI 588
  • Chapter LXVIII 603
  • Chapter LXIX 610
  • Chapter LXX 613
  • Chapter LXXI 623
  • Chapter LXXI 629
  • Chapter LXXIII 640
  • Chapter LXXIV 649
  • Book V - Ninety Six 653
  • Chapter LXXV 654
  • Chapter LXXVI 661
  • Chapter LXXVII 667
  • Chapter LXXVIII 675
  • Chapter LXXIX 681
  • Chapter LXXX 687
  • Chapter LXXXI 694
  • Chapter LXXXII 698
  • Chapter LXXXIII 705
  • Chapter LXXXIV 711
  • Chapter LXXXV 715
  • Chapter LXXXVI 725
  • Chapter LXXXVII 733
  • Chapter LXXXVIII 743
  • Book VI - * Land of Liberty 759
  • Chapter Lxxxix 761
  • Chapter XC 765
  • Chapter XCI 771
  • Chapter XCII 782
  • Chapter XCIII 790
  • Chapter XCIV 800
  • Chapter XCV 809
  • Chapter XCVI 815
  • Chapter XCVII 830
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