Modern Trends in World Religions

By A. Eustace Haydon | Go to book overview

XXIII
THE TASK OF CHRISTIANITY

By FRANCIS J. MCCONNELL

IT IS noteworthy that in dealing with world-wide tendencies bearing upon its own success or failure, Christianity is today willing to face these tendencies. There have been periods in the history of the church when religious leaders have not been quite willing to look at movements in the intellectual and social and practical realms which have seemed to carry any implication of change in Christianity. Just at present it is fair to say that the fullest statement of tendencies significant for Christianity comes from within the camp of Christianity itself, even when these tendencies seem to threaten something essential to Christianity. This has resulted, too, not from the primary aim of defending the Christian world-view, but with the fundamental purpose of getting at the truth. There has been within Christian circles an increasing friendliness to the full utterance of whatever view from any quarter seems likely to help us on toward a more adequate view of man and the universe.

To begin with, we glance at that change in philosophical theorizing, especially that which relies most upon modern physics, which has been proclaimed as making theistic belief easier. Physical metaphysics, so to speak, is today virtually everywhere telling us that the old so-called lump theory of matter is dead--that we no longer conceive of atoms as little bits of stuff existing on their own account but as centers of force, negatively charged electrons moving as in miniature solar systems around the positively charged proton--the activities capable of being intel-

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