Governing the Tongue: The Politics of Speech in Early New England

By Jane Kamensky | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Like all scholarly voyages, mine has been a collaborative path from first to last. Standing at the finish line, it is a joy at last to recognize some of the people and institutions whose support--financial, intellectual, and emotional--has made the journey always feasible, often bearable, and sometimes even delightful.

When this book was in its infancy as a dissertation, I benefited from the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, whose Fellowship in the Humanities underwrote my graduate education. Brandeis University helped to nurture the project through its stormy adolescence. Part of that help came in the form of a grant from the Mazer Fund for Faculty Research, which provided needed funds at a critical juncture. Even more important has been the institution's unwavering support for the growth and development of junior faculty, without which I might not have become either an effective teacher or a productive scholar. As the book approached its adulthood, I benefited from a year of uninterrupted research leave granted by Brandeis and funded by a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for University Teachers (grant number FA-34093-96), a Faculty Fellowship from the Program in Religion and American History of the Pew Charitable Trusts, and a Fellowship from the Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute of Radcliffe College.

No less essential to this enterprise were the sometimes heroic efforts of archivists and librarians at a number of institutions, including the

-vii-

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Governing the Tongue: The Politics of Speech in Early New England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • A NOTE ON THE TEXT x
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 3
  • One The Sweetest Meat, the Bitterest Poison 17
  • Two A Most Unquiet Hiding Place 43
  • Three The Misgovernment of Woman's Tongue 71
  • Four "Publick Fathers" and Cursing Sons 99
  • Five Saying and Unsaying 127
  • Six The Tongue is a Witch 150
  • EPILOGUE 181
  • Appendix - Litigation over Speech in Massachusetts, 1630-1692 195
  • Notes 203
  • Index 281
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