History of Labour in the United States - Vol. 2

By John R. Commons; David J. Saposs et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
THE POLITICAL UPHEAVAL, 1886-1887

The Greenback Labor party, 440. The Butler campaign, 440. New political outlook, 441. New York Central Labor Union, 441. Its radical declaration of principles, 442. Early activities, 442. The conspiracy law, 443. Campaign of 1882, 444. The Theiss boycott case, 444. Decision to go into politics, 445. Henry George's life and philosophy, 446. Comparison with John Swinton, 447. California experiences, 447. The "new agrarianism," 448. Availability as a candidate, 448. The platform, 449. Attitude of the socialists, 449. Democratic nomination, 450. The George- Hewitt campaign, 450. The Leader, 451. The general press, 451. Hewitt's view of the struggle, 452. George's view of the struggle, 452. Reverend Dr. McGlynn, 453. Attitude of the Catholic Church, 453. Powderly's attitude, 453 The vote, 453. Effect on the old parties, 454. Beginning of friction with the socialists, 454. The choice of a name for the party, 455. "Land and labor" clubs, 455. The county convention and the party constitution, 455. Call for a state convention, 456. Opposition of the socialists, 456. Their capture of the Leader, 456. The Standard and the attack upon the Catholic hierarchy, 456. The Anti-poverty Society, 456. George's attitude towards the purely labour demands, 457. McMackin's ruling on the eligibility of socialists to membership, 457. Struggle in the assembly districts, 458. Attitude of the trade unions, 458. Gompers attitude, 458. Unseating of the socialist delegates at the state convention, 459. The new platform, 460. Revolt of the socialists, 460. Progressive Labor party, 460. Swinton's nomination, 461. The vote, 461. Causes of the failure of the movement, 461. Political movement outside of New York, 461. Labour tickets, 462. Labour platforms, 462. Success in the elections, 462. Attitude of the Federation, 463. Powderly's attitude, 464. Efforts for national organisations, 464. The national convention in Cincinnati, 465. National Union Labor party, 465. Labour's attitude towards the new party, 465. Spring elections of 1887, 466. Autumn election of 1887, 466. Spring elections of 1888, 467. The Chicago Socialists, 467. The Union Labor party presidential nomination, 468. The United Labor party, 468. Predominance of the farmers in the Union Labor party, 468. Apostasy of many labour leaders, 468. Powderly's secret circular, 469. The vote, 469. The order of the Videttes, 469.

THE indifference of the wage-earners to independent politics, displayed by the greenback vote of 1880,1 continued until 1886. In 1882 an attempt was made in Pennsylvania, where labour was still taking a part in the management of the Greenback

____________________
1
See above, II, 251.

-439-

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