The Political Calypso: True Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago, 1962-1987

By Louis Regis | Go to book overview

7
Happy Anniversary: The 25th Anniversary of Independence Calypso Monarch Competition

The date 31 August 1987 marked the nation's 25th anniversary of independence. In the history of any nation, such an event serves as occasion for celebration of achievement, as cause for assessment and rededication to the national service, and as assurance of continuity or tradition which is a source of strength and inspiration in facing the future. While all this can be ritualised by means of parades, awards ceremonies and the like, Trinidad and Tobago has the added advantage of the calypso which can articulate the aspirations and immortalise the achievements of the people in their own language.

One can only wonder at the curious fact that the decade after 1962 witnessed no national independence calypso competition. Perhaps it was that those who should normally have seen to this, felt that the calypso segment at the annual PNM Buy Local jamboree was enough, but when one recalls that the national government never thought of national awards until forced to respond to Granger's Pegasus initiative,1 one may well conclude that the organisers of the independence celebrations had simply forgotten about the calypso. As it was, the second independence calypso competition was realised at the 10th Anniversary of Independence celebrations, that is 1972. There, singers performed two songs, and Chalkdust, the winner, offered his "We Are Ten Years Old", a trenchant critique of a decade of statehood, a comprehensive catalogue of nonachievement. Perhaps the popularity of this excellent song, coming in the wake of a Buy Local Competition which, though moribund at this time, had taken an increasingly critical tone, convinced the several independence celebrations committees that they should spare themselves embarrassment at the hands of the calypsonian. This may explain why in 1977, the 15th anniversary of independence, there was no competition although the state coffers were awash with oil dollars. It may also account for the omission of the Calypso from the 20th anniversary of independence celebrations in 1982 when the "total breakdown fete", as Stalin calls it in " Breakdown Party"

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Calypso: True Opposition in Trinidad and Tobago, 1962-1987
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations viii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • List of Abbreviations xv
  • 1 - The Calypso and Politics 1956-1962 1
  • 2 - The Model Nation 1963-1965 20
  • 3 - God Bless Our Nation 1966-1970 37
  • 4 - The Roaring Seventies 1971-1975 69
  • 5 - "I, Eric Eustace Williams" 1976-1981 121
  • 6 - "The Sinking Ship" 1982-1986 163
  • 7 - Happy Anniversary: the 25th Anniversary of Independence Calypso Monarch Competition 195
  • 8 - Ars Poetica 208
  • Conclusion 236
  • Afterword 238
  • Notes 240
  • Appendixes 257
  • Bibliography 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.