Roman Britain and the English Settlements

By J. N. L. Myres; R. G. Collingwood | Go to book overview

XIII
THE COUNTRY-SIDE

E VEN when the towns were at the height of their prosperity, by far the largest part of the inhabitants of Roman Britain were country-folk, living either in villages or in the isolated farmhouses, large or small, which are called villas; and of these again, though some worked at industries like mining, pottery, and so forth, the great majority were occupied in agriculture. We should probably not be far wrong if we reckoned that at no time during the Roman period did agriculture occupy less than two-thirds of the inhabitants of Britain.

Something has already been said about agriculture in pre- Roman Britain, and of the development it received at the hands of the Belgae, leading to production on a scale which made it possible to export wheat and other produce. This surplus of production over and above what was needed for the subsistence of the agricultural population was diverted by the Roman conquest into two channels: the imperial taxes, especially the annona or wheat-tax for the maintenance of the army and the government officials, and the local taxes which went to support urban life. The Roman Peace, coupled with these two demands for surplus produce, must have stimulated agriculture from the first, although neither archaeological evidence nor literary sources afford any hint that the Romans taught the Britons to use any new agricultural methods. The agricultural life of the British country-side is in substance and character British in almost every detail known to us; what is Roman about it is the political framework into which it is fitted, and to a certain extent the manners and customs of the people who pursued it.

In the four coloniae, people lived according to Roman custom in towns who were engaged in cultivating their plots of land in the neighbouring country-side. This combination of agriculture with town life may possibly have become general. Many towns were surrounded by regions in which villas and villages are rare. Round Canterbury, for instance, the country seems to have been almost deserted by comparison with the dense villa-population of north-western Kent. This and similar cases elsewhere may indicate that people lived in the towns and worked on the land

-208-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Roman Britain and the English Settlements
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface to Books I-Iv v
  • Preface to Book V viii
  • Contents xi
  • List of Maps xxvi
  • Book I - Britain Before the Roman Conquest 1
  • II - Britain in the Time of Julius Caesar 16
  • III - Caesar's Invasion 32
  • IV - From Caesar to Claudius 54
  • Book II - The Age of Conquest 76
  • VI - Caratacus and Boudicca 88
  • VII - From Boudicca to Agricola 105
  • VIII - The Making of the Frontier 120
  • IX - The Frontier After Hadrian 140
  • Book III - Britain Under Roman Rule 161
  • XI - The People 174
  • XIII - The Towns 186
  • XIII - The Country-Side 208
  • XIV - Industry and Commerce 226
  • XV - Art 247
  • XVI - Religion 261
  • Book IV - The End of Roman Britain 274
  • XVIII - The End of Roman Rule 291
  • XIX - Britain in the Fifth Century 302
  • Book V - The English Settlements 325
  • XXI - The Course of the Conquest in Kent and the South-East 352
  • XXII - The Fenlands, East Anglia, and the Problem of Wessex 383
  • XXIII - The Humbrenses 411
  • XXIV - The Character of the Conquest 425
  • Appendix I 457
  • Appendix II 458
  • Appendix III 460
  • Bibliography 462
  • Index 491
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 515

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.