Sexual Behaviour in Canada: Patterns and Problems

By Benjamin Schlesinger | Go to book overview

Sexual identity and sexual roles *

CONNIE YOUNG


THE ORIGIN OF OUR PRESENT-DAY SEXUAL ROLES

The history of human beings on this earth is hundreds and thousands of years old. But long before the great civilizations of China and Egypt existed and long before human-like creatures resembled modern man, it was understood by these primitive people that little human creatures emerged alive from the half of the population who exhibited certain physical characteristics such as protruding breasts. The other half of the creatures who never produced little ones were understood to have other characteristics, like a penis. Also, the half of the population which produced the little ones, or 'babies' as they came to be called in our language, also produced milk from their breasts to nourish these babies until they could accommodate themselves to chewing foodstuff and to feeding themselves.

With these given circumstances it naturally evolved that the half of the population that produced babies were useless on hunting trips, especially during pregnancy, when they were liable to be tired and unable to climb or march strenuously, or could hold up the hunting party by giving birth at any time. Also, once they produced their young, the women were virtually tied to their babies through breastfeeding - at the conclusion of which period they usually produced another baby. It naturally evolved that women stayed close to the caves, taking care of the young, making clothing, and preparing food for the men. They also scrounged close to the caves for growing carrots and berries, and, in some cultures, cultivated small gardens.

____________________
*
Reprinted from The School Guidance Worker 29 ( May-June 1974), 23-28.

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