Sexual Behaviour in Canada: Patterns and Problems

By Benjamin Schlesinger | Go to book overview

Current sex research in Canada

DOLORES L. SHYMKO

Although Canadian sex research has not, thus far, received the recognition or acclaim of such sex research notables as Masters and Johnson ( 1966, 1970) and Kinsey ( 1948, 1953), there are a number of Canadian studies that have provided a valuable beginning in understanding the specific characteristics of Canadian sexual mores. The majority of this research has examined aspects of the sexual attitudes and behaviour of Canadian university students by comparing intranational and international samples. The authors of these studies have provided empirical and hypothetical interpretations of their findings with reference to how recent changes in the sexual attitudes and behaviour of university students have implications for appraising what might be called the sexual renaissance in Canada. Some of their major observations are summarized below.

Mann ( 1968) initially planned a Canada-wide research study to investigate the sexual attitudes and activities of youth, but owing to administrative and financial difficulties reduced the size and representation of his sample. The completed study involved samples of university students from Alberta and Ontario, with the majority from the latter. Mann qualified the representativeness of his sample as being strongly Anglo-Saxon, mostly lower middle class, and more 'religiously' inclined than most student groups. He reported that a follow-up telephone survey of the students sampled indicated a readiness to answer questions relating to their present personal sexual attitudes and behaviour.

Mann made some general observations about male-female differences in sexual attitudes and behaviour. Only 29 per cent of the males stated they discussed personal matters about sex or dating with one or more of their parents, as compared to 44 per cent of the females. Although it seemed that parents provided

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