Sexual Behaviour in Canada: Patterns and Problems

By Benjamin Schlesinger | Go to book overview

Short-term treatment methods for delaying ejaculation *

STEPHEN NEIGER

The expression 'premature ejaculation' is generally used to describe a condition of insufficient staying power in men during intercourse or a reduced ability to prolong the act at will. Unfortunately, this label is just as vague as are 'impotence' and 'frigidity,' because it is supposed to cover a great variety of conditions.

Patients who ejaculate even before penetration occurs (ante portas ejaculation; ejaculatio precipitata), should really not be given the same label as is used in the far more frequent situation where, although able to go on for many minutes, the man still cannot last long enough in intercourse to satisfy his partner. The inexperienced, overanxious groom who spills his semen out of excitement when first seeing his bride in the nude is said to have had a 'premature ejaculation,' and so is the experienced husband who, after a period of absence, has built up so much desire for his wife that he simply cannot contain himself long enough. We even use the same label for a completely different semi-impotent state found in some aging men.

In an attempt to bring at least some order into the confusion, Dr. G. Lombard Kelly,1 a well-known sexologist, has coined two very useful terms to distinguish between premature ejaculation in sexually sthenic (vigorous) and sexually asthenic (weak) males. The sthenic patient with the complaint of premature ejaculation tends to be young and healthy. His libido, his erection, ejaculation and orgasm are all in perfect order; only the timing of his climax causes him concern. These men - the large majority of those complaining about prematurity-have such an intense sexual desire that they cannot sufficiently prolong the act. This is especially true after a period of abstinence.

____________________
*
Reprinted from Canadian Family Physician ( March 1972), 62-66.

-84-

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