To Be the Main Leaders of Our People: A History of Minnesota Ojibwe Politics, 1825-1898

By Rebecca Kugel | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
"In Religion and Other Things I Ought to Be the Main Leader of My People": The Ojibwe Reassess An Alliance, 1852-1882

I n June of 1868 supporters of the civil leaders among the Mississipi Ojibwe villages moved to the newly created reservation of White Earth. Persuaded that removal from central Minnesota would happen whether they wanted it or opposed it, they hoped at the new reservation to embark on the program of Ojibwedirected social change that had kindled the interest of some civil leaders dating back to the 1830s and influencing their earliest dealings with the ABCFM missionaries. These Mississippi Ojibwe had come to believe that they could regenerate their communities, sundered over the previous two decades by the political disputes with the warriors. In the process of reasserting the primacy of civil over war leaders, the leaders of the emigrants also sought to solidify their individual leadership positions. Social reform would thus address several interrelated problems.1

Conversion to Christianity and increased reliance on male agriculture were the mechanisms by which this social redirection would occur. Fully aware of the longstanding American Indian policy goals of Christian conversion and civilization, the Mississippi emigrants believed a community of interest existed between themselves and Euro-American reformers and government officials. They dramatized their commitment to the mutual reform agenda with a telling symbolic gesture. The "chiefs & Braves," they announced, "throw down their blankets & put on the white man's clothes." Additionally, they requested "teams, ploughs & tools of all kinds for farming." And finally, "most" of the emigrants "renounced" Ojibwe religious practice and "embraced the faith of the palefaces." Lest Euro-Americans miss the point of these actions, the Ojibwe provided an explanation. They had begun to follow "the steps of the palefaces"; actions they understood as "the first move" in a program of social and economic reorientation designed to enable them "to raise from our present poor condition."2

These startling actions by a particular segment of the Mississippi villages are as significant as they are unexpected. Little in the preceding twenty years suggested

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
To Be the Main Leaders of Our People: A History of Minnesota Ojibwe Politics, 1825-1898
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.